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Анекдот дня по итогам голосования за 24 июня 2024

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Вот все спорят о феминизмах, Нужно ли говорить "поэтка","блогерка", "инженерка"...
И для меня новыми красками заиграла фраза
"Актер вошёл в гримёрку"
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cherjr
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Анекдот дня по итогам голосования за 22 июня 2024

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Идея Т-Банка понравилась А-банку, Б-банку, В-банку... А вот Газпромбанк решил не менять имя.
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TGIF: Cheap Fakes

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Welcome back. It’s TGIF

→ Don’t believe your eyes: The big move from the Biden presidential campaign over the last two weeks has been to say that what you see with your own eyes is not what is happening, not at all, not even close. Biden is young and strapping (I literally just saw him jump off a galloping horse, spin, and land on his feet with a gun drawn). The target this week: Biden froze onstage for a moment as a crowd applauded, and it was a little weird, but it was made much weirder by Barack Obama taking Biden by the hand, giving it a little squeeze, and gently walking him offstage.

You shouldn’t believe me; simply watch the video for yourself. Disinformation police, gather! Fact checkers, unite! Here’s the Associated Press with a “fact check.” It’s not a freeze, it’s a pause!

And as the AP notes, it’s also not even a thing: “A source who helped organize, and attended, the fundraiser told the AP that there was nothing noteworthy about this moment.” The trouble is, it takes two to decide whether something is noteworthy. When I hit another car in the parking garage, is that noteworthy? I don’t think so. Why are you so obsessed with whether your bumper lives on the sidewalk now? “This did not happen,” said Eric Schultz, senior adviser to Obama, responding to the video showing that it really did happen. CBS News called one embarrassing clip “a digitally altered video,” yet it was the exact version shared by the White House. 

Others have come up with a new word for videos that are technically completely real but also annoying to the candidate who simply must win, and that term is cheap fakes. Like deep fake, but real, but we hate them.

Now listen, you can say, “Yeah, Biden is old, but the other guy is absolutely nuts and surrounds himself with maniacs, so who cares?” That’s a really good argument. That’s compelling. But that would involve persuasion and an admission that the dear leader is human. It’s much better to say: those videos are lies, because we just saw Biden water skiing while holding a goddamn dolphin over his head. Okay? Those are the real facts, please get back to work. 

→ Oh God, the polls: It’s looking tight. Though not in Iowa, where Trump leads Biden 50 percent to 32 percent among likely voters, while RFK earned 9 percent, according to a new Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa poll. The Register suggests that the former president’s convictions aren’t an issue for many voters. In fact, one poll respondent, who became a Republican because of Trump and plans to vote for him in November, goes on to say, “The more they try to get him out of the picture, the stronger they make him. I, for one, believe that the charges are bogus.” As Semafor political reporter David Weigel said: “No Democrat has gotten under 40% in Iowa since 1980. Biden at 32% would be the worst D performance there since 1924.”

But then, twist! A Fox News poll shows Biden two points ahead of Trump on the national stage. (It’s funny because the people who said Fox News polls can’t ever be trusted when they showed Trump ahead are now saying this is an amazing, definitive new poll.) I, for one, believe all the polls. I think it’s gonna be a tight, fun race, like watching two grizzled old tortoises get to a finish line. Which one will it be? Someone put an iceberg wedge on the field to keep them on course. 

→ Hell yeah, Congress: The Senate just overwhelmingly approved new pro–nuclear power legislation on Tuesday, with a vote of 88–2. Who are the two? Just two senators who hate the idea of copious clean nuclear energy and want us to stay on dirty coal so that the Extinction Rebellion kids can keep protesting by gluing their hands to our commuter thoroughfares. Logical. Simple. Yes, the two holdouts are Senators Ed Markey, and—you guessed it—Bernie Sanders. But let’s focus on the bright side: our Senate just did something bipartisan, functional, and pro-progress. We love to see it. 

The bill does a number of things, like streamlining the permit process, cutting costs for developers, and opening to new technology like small modular nuclear reactors. Meanwhile, protesting climate change or something, Just Stop Oil folks this week are spraying Stonehenge with orange powder. And honestly, it looks cool. Painting Stonehenge is not a bad idea. Especially if you want some angry Anglo-Saxon deity (oh my god it’s my dad! He wants to read Beowulf to you, and for you to get your elbows off the table!) to haunt you and your descendants. 

→ Hell yeah, LAUSD: The Los Angeles Unified School District voted Tuesday to ban cell phones during the entire school day. The nation’s second largest school district will now have to figure out how to actually enforce this new policy, considering solutions like phone lockers or maybe pouches, per The Wall Street Journal. This is part of a nationwide movement to free children from their phones, a movement majorly inspired by friend-of-The FP Jonathan Haidt, with whom I am personally obsessed (he’s so smart, he’s so nice, great hair). One boarding school in New England even replaced smartphones with Light Phones that have only calling and texting and look like this:

This image is terrifying to a 12-year-old. Imagine trying to watch TikToks on this old brick. No selfie camera, no apps, no nothing. Perfect. (To be clear, the phone situation is also the fault of helicopter parents who can’t stand the idea of their little preteens being inaccessible for a few hours.)

→ Gaza pier is dunzo: The dream of America somehow using a beautiful pier to deliver food to Gaza, which would magically have a special non-Hamas government to then distribute the goods, is over. After what we’re told is $230 million in construction costs (you just know that amount is a quarter of what we actually paid), the pier is being dismantled very soon. I never thought I would yearn for the high-speed rail to nowhere, but it seems preferable to the pier to the bottom of the Mediterranean. 

As Vice Admiral Brad Cooper, the Central Command deputy commander, put it: issues with the pier “stemmed solely from unanticipated weather.” It’s summer in the Mediterranean, boys. How much unanticipated weather can there really be?

→ Candace Owens comes out against World War II: Candace Owens, a star conservative commentator now building her own media company, argues that it was a mistake for the U.S. to enter World War II. When a journalist asks to confirm this, saying: “So, you think that America shouldn’t have gone into that second world war?” Candace replies: “Yeah, and that is a radical statement. People don’t know how to deal with that because we’ve all been so brainwashed by the school system to believe that ‘Look how great things are. . . . ’ This whole idea of international liberalism—now it’s not just about your problems, it’s about solving the world’s problems. Let’s make sure that in Pakistan there’s a trans flag waving. No.” So, England should have fallen to the Nazis. Because otherwise we get The Trans Flag. This is where the new right is at. They believe World War II was a mistake; the Nazis would have been fine controlling Europe, which is none of our business anyway; and when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor we should have said, “Thank you! Hawaii always seemed gay to us too! Men wearing necklaces made of flowers?!” Thanks for bravely saying what no one else will dare to, Candace.

Meanwhile, who’s Candace Owens’ new best friend, coming on the show to commiserate? None other than Briahna Joy Gray, the former press secretary for Bernie Sanders. It was inevitable they would find each other. All my favorites eventually do. 

→ Speaking of best friends: The cool internet Nazis gathered in person this week. Yes, Nick Fuentes, Sulaiman Ahmed, Lucas Gage, Jake Shields—and David Duke, the old KKK grand wizard—got together to take a bunch of pics and talk about the Jewish Question (and no, it’s not “What makes this night different from all other nights?”). If you want to watch an alarming scene, look at Nick Fuentes speaking to a cheering crowd in Detroit. They’re all really excited about the anti-Israel protests happening on campus. Vibing with Candace and Briahna, former Bernie staffer Matt Orfalea said Nick Fuentes makes a lot of sense: “This guy doesn’t sound like a ‘Nazi’ or ‘white supremacist.’ He’s antiwar, he’s outspoken *against* geocoding Arabs, and won’t vote for a presidential candidate unless they oppose war with Iran. Am I missing something? If so, what?” 

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cherjr
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bogorad
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Architects chosen for Paris Pompidou museum redesign

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The modern art museum, originally opened in 1977, is closing for a €262 million, five-year refurbishment from September 2025 for asbestos removal and renovation.

The three architects -- partners Nicolas Moreau and Hiroko Kusunoki, along with Mexico's Frida Escobedo -- will be in charge of redeveloping the art spaces at an estimated cost of €186 million.

The Moreau Kusunoki agency created the central pavilion of the Sciences-Po University campus in Paris, while Escobedo was selected in 2022 to renovate the modern art wing of the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

The Pompidou Centre said the trio will respect "the DNA" of the museum and its current architecture, originally designed by Italy's Renzo Piano and Britain's Richard Rogers.

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Among changes will be a redesigned library and a panoramic terrace with views across central Paris.

"La Piazza", the large open area in front of the museum, will be redeveloped with more seating areas.

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Election breakdown: Manifestos, party in-fighting and spending plans

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During the election period we will be publishing a bi-weekly 'election breakdown' to help you keep up with the latest developments. You can receive these as an email by going to the newsletter section here and selecting subscribe to 'breaking news alerts'.

It's now 10 days since Macron's announcement of a snap election and the comedy/ drama/ farce of the first week (which included the right-wing Les Republicains' leader barricading himself in his office) has given way to the slightly more serious business of the official campaign phase.

The formal campaign period began on Monday, giving parties two weeks until the first round of voting on Sunday, June 30th - can the newly created alliances hold together for a fortnight? Who can say?

Gallic alliances

At the end of a week of frantic alliance building - in which parties agreed not to stand candidates against each other in certain seats in order to avoid splitting their vote - we seem to have settled largely into three blocks; the united (for now) parties of the left making up the Nouveau Front Populaire, Macron's centrists and Marine Le Pen's far-right with a tiny rump of support from some members of Les Républicains (LR).

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Of course it's not quite that straightforward. That controversial deal made by Eric Ciotti infuriated most of his party and in the end around 60 LR candidates are abiding by his deal to ally with Le Pen's party, while the party will field around 400 candidates against Le Pen. Meanwhile Ciotti is contesting his sacking through the courts while his colleagues desperately try to get rid of him. 

Cracks are also emerging on the left - the hard-left La France Insoumise (LFI) is the subject of bitter infighting over candidate selection after several high-profile MPs who have been critical of party leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon were not selected to stand again, while Mélenchon ally (and convicted domestic abuser) Adrien Quatennens was. Quatennens withdrew his candidacy after an outcry, but several former LFI candidates are now standing against official LFI candidates.

Meanwhile within the Macron camp, quite a few of the senior party members seem distinctly unenthusiastic about their boss' election gamble.

Of course, all this chaos is nothing compared to what will happen if none of these blocks win an absolute majority in parliament, and Macron is forced to try and create some agreement between these warring factions . . .

Manifestos

The main parties have all now unveiled their manifestos. You can read a breakdown of what they would all mean HERE, with particular emphasis on the policies that would affect foreigners living in France and those hoping to move here some day.

The Nouveau Front Populaire promises a high-spend, big-state domestic policy (with the only slight quibble being how all that would be paid for) and some very carefully worded compromises on the foreign policy issues that have split the parties.

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Meanwhile the Macronists, slightly hobbled by the fact that they've already laid out more of their programme for government, also resorted to chucking money at the problem, promising to triple the 'Macron bonus' that some workers get and various other bonuses and benefits.

Rassemblement National  

Over on the far-right Le Pen's Rassemblement National has largely avoided the political chaos and infighting of their rivals, but appear rather unsure what their policies are.

They published a manifesto - find details here - but then seem to have spent the last few days frantically rowing back on some of their promises, including axing VAT on 'essential' products. Could this be because they secretly know that their policies are financially unworkable? A projection from the UK's Financial Times estimated that RN's policies would cost at least twice as much to the French economy as Liz Truss' disastrous budget did to the UK's.

Finally, RN's pick for prime minister - 28-year-old Jordan Bardella - announced that he only wants to be PM if the party gains an absolute majority in parliament.

What next?

We have another 10 days of election campaigns before the first round of voting on Sunday, June 30th and then the second round a week later on July 7th.

There are likely to also be some TV debates, although details for date, time and participants (especially the representative for the left alliance) are still TBC.

At present it's a toss up between which will happen first - Kylian Mbappé's nose healing or one of the party alliances spectacularly imploding. 

You can find all the latest election news in our French elections section HERE, or sign up to receive this bi-weekly briefing as an email by going to the newsletter section here and selecting subscribe to 'breaking news alerts'.

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Keep Up the Pressure on Higher Ed To Stop DEI

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Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences recently announced an end to the use of mandatory diversity statements in hiring.
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